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The Apa protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis stimulates gamma interferon-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from purified protein derivative-positive individuals and affords protection in a guinea pig model.

Kumar, Priti and Rao, Amara R and Challu, Vijay K and Chadda, Vineet K and Satchidanandam, Vijaya (2003) The Apa protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis stimulates gamma interferon-secreting CD4+ and CD8+ T cells from purified protein derivative-positive individuals and affords protection in a guinea pig model. In: Infection and Immunity, 71 (4). pp. 1929-1937.

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Abstract

The search to identify Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens capable of conferring protective immunity against tuberculosis has received a boost owing to the resurgence of tuberculosis over the past two decades. It has long been recognized that lymphoid cells are required for protection against M. tuberculosis. While traditionally the CD4+ populations of T cells were believed to predominantly serve this protective function, a pivotal role for CD8+ T cells in this task has been increasingly appreciated. We show that the 50- to 55-kDa Apa protein, specified by the Rv1860 gene of M. tuberculosis, can elicit both lymphoproliferative response and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) production from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of purified protein derivative (PPD)-positive individuals, with significant differences recorded in the levels of responsiveness between PPD-positive healthy controls and pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Flow cytometric analysis of whole blood stimulated with the recombinant Apa protein revealed a sizeable proportion of CD8+ T cells in addition to CD4+ T cells contributing to IFN-gamma secretion. PBMC responding to the Apa protein produced no interleukin-4, revealing a Th1 phenotype. A DNA vaccine and a poxvirus recombinant expressing the Apa protein were constructed and tested for their ability to protect immunized guinea pigs against a challenge dose of virulent M. tuberculosis. Although the DNA vaccine afforded little protection, the poxvirus recombinant boost after DNA vaccine priming conferred a significant level of protective immunity, bringing about a considerable reduction in mycobacterial counts from the challenge bacilli in spleens of immunized guinea pigs, a result comparable to that achieved by BCG vaccination.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copyright belongs to American Society for Microbiology.
Keywords: Immune System;Infection;Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Department/Centre: Division of Biological Sciences > Microbiology & Cell Biology
Date Deposited: 15 Oct 2007
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2010 04:39
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/id/eprint/11942

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