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SUPFAM—a database of potential protein superfamily relationships derived by comparing sequence-based and structure-based families: implications for structural genomics and function annotation in genomes

Pandit, Shashi B and Gosar, Dilip and Abhiman, S and Sujatha, S and Dixit, Sayali S and Mhatre, Natasha S and Sowdhamini, R and Srinivasan, N (2002) SUPFAM—a database of potential protein superfamily relationships derived by comparing sequence-based and structure-based families: implications for structural genomics and function annotation in genomes. In: Nucleic Acids Research, 30 (1). pp. 289-293.

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Official URL: http://nar.oxfordjournals.org/content/30/1/289

Abstract

Members of a superfamily of proteins could result from divergent evolution of homologues with insignificant similarity in the amino acid sequences. A superfamily relationship is detected commonly after the three-dimensional structures of the proteins are determined using X-ray analysis or NMR. The SUPFAM database described here relates two homologous protein families in a multiple sequence alignment database of either known or unknown structure. The present release (1.1), which is the first version of the SUPFAM database, has been derived by analysing Pfam, which is one of the commonly used databases of multiple sequence alignments of homologous proteins. The first step in establishing SUPFAM is to relate Pfam families with the families in PALI, which is an alignment database of homologous proteins of known structure that is derived largely from SCOP. The second step involves relating Pfam families which could not be associated reliably with a protein superfamily of known structure. The profile matching procedure, IMPALA, has been used in these steps. The first step resulted in identification of 1280 Pfam families (out of 2697, i.e. 47%) which are related, either by close homologous connection to a SCOP family or by distant relationship to a SCOP family, potentially forming new superfamily connections. Using the profiles of 1417 Pfam families with apparently no structural information, an all-against-all comparison involving a sequence-profile match using IMPALA resulted in clustering of 67 homologous protein families of Pfam into 28 potential new superfamilies. Expansion of groups of related proteins of yet unknown structural information, as proposed in SUPFAM, should help in identifying ‘priority proteins’ for structure determination in structural genomics initiatives to expand the coverage of structural information in the protein sequence space. For example, we could assign 858 distinct Pfam domains in 2203 of the gene products in the genome of Mycobacterium tubercolosis. Fifty-one of these Pfam families of unknown structure could be clustered into 17 potentially new superfamilies forming good targets for structural genomics.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copyright of this article belongs to Oxford University Press.
Department/Centre: Division of Biological Sciences > Molecular Biophysics Unit
Date Deposited: 09 Oct 2007
Last Modified: 22 Feb 2012 07:23
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/id/eprint/12162

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