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Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

Narayan, Ganesh M and Gopinath, K and Sridhar, R (2008) Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs. In: IEEE International Symposium on Theoretical Aspects of Software Engineering, June 17 - 19, 2008, Nanjing, China. (In Press)

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Abstract

Call graphs depict the static, caller-callee relation between "functions" in a program. With most source/target languages supporting functions as the primitive unit of composition, call graphs naturally form the fundamental control flow representation available to understand/develop software. They are also the substrate on which various interprocedural analyses are performed and are integral part of program comprehension/testing. Given their universality and usefulness, it is imperative to ask if call graphs exhibit any intrinsic graph theoretic features ­ across versions, program domains and source languages. This work is an attempt to answer these questions: we present and investigate a set of meaningful graph measures that help us understand call graphs better; we establish how these measures correlate, if any, across different languages and program domains; we also assess the overall, language independent software quality by suitably interpreting these measures.

Item Type: Conference Paper
Additional Information: ©2008 IEEE. Personal use of this material is permitted. However, permission to reprint/republish this material for advertising or promotional purposes or for creating new collective works for resale or redistribution to servers or lists, or to reuse any copyrighted component of this work in other works must be obtained from the IEEE. The conference paper is in press and the publication details are not available yet.
Keywords: Software Engineering;Call Graphs;Software Metrics;Statistics
Department/Centre: Division of Electrical Sciences > Computer Science & Automation (Formerly, School of Automation)
Date Deposited: 28 Mar 2008
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2010 04:43
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/id/eprint/13528

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