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Exploration of the Secondary Structure Specific Differential Solvation Dynamics between the Native and Molten Globule States of the Protein HP-36

Bandyopadhyay, Sanjoy and Chakraborty, Sudip and Bagchi, Biman (2006) Exploration of the Secondary Structure Specific Differential Solvation Dynamics between the Native and Molten Globule States of the Protein HP-36. In: Journal of Physical Chemistry B, 110 (41). pp. 20629-20634.

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Abstract

Recent experiments have shown that the time dependence of fluorescence Stokes shift of a chromophore is substantially different when the chromophore is located in a molten globule (MG) state and in the native state of the same protein. To understand the origin of this difference, particularly the role of water in the differential solvation of the protein in the native and the MG states, we have carried out fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water of a partially unfolded MG state of the protein HP-36 and compared the results with the solvation dynamics of the protein in the folded native state. It is observed that the polar solvation dynamics of the three helical segments of the protein is influenced in a nonuniform heterogeneous manner in the MG state. While the equilibrium solvation time correlation function for helix-3 has been found to relax faster in the MG state as compared to that in the native state, the decay of the corresponding function for the other two helices slows down in the MG state. A careful analysis shows that the origin of such heterogeneous relative solvation behavior lies in the differential location of the polar probe residues and their exposure to bulk solvent. We find a significant negative cross-correlation between the contribution (to the solvation energy of a tagged amino acid residue) of water and the other groups of the protein, indicating a competing role in solvation. The sensitivity of solvation dynamics to the secondary structure and the immediate environment can be used to discriminate the partially unfolded and folded states. These results therefore should be useful in explaining recent solvation dynamics experiments on native and MG states of proteins.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copyright of this article belongs to American Chemical Society.
Department/Centre: Division of Chemical Sciences > Solid State & Structural Chemistry Unit
Date Deposited: 28 May 2008
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2010 04:45
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/id/eprint/14068

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