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Synthesis of biodiesel from edible and non-edible oils in supercritical alcohols and enzymatic synthesis in supercritical carbon dioxide

Rathore, Vivek and Madras, Giridhar (2007) Synthesis of biodiesel from edible and non-edible oils in supercritical alcohols and enzymatic synthesis in supercritical carbon dioxide. In: Fuel, 86 (17-18). pp. 2650-2659.

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Abstract

Biodiesel is an attractive alternative fuel because it is environmentally friendly and can be synthesized from edible and non-edible oils. The synthesis of biodiesel from edible oils like palm oil and groundnut oil and from crude non-edible oils like Pongamia pinnata and Jatropha curcas was investigated in supercritical methanol and ethanol without using any catalyst from 200 to $400^0 C$ at 200 bar. The variables affecting the conversion during transesterification, such as molar ratio of alcohol to oil, temperature and time were investigated in supercritical methanol and ethanol. Biodiesel was also synthesized enzymatically with Novozym-435 lipase in presence of supercritical carbon dioxide. The effect of reaction variables such as temperature, molar ratio, enzyme loading and kinetics of the reaction was investigated for enzymatic synthesis in supercritical carbon dioxide. Very high conversions (>80%) were obtained within 10 min and nearly complete conversions were obtained at within 40 min for the synthesis of biodiesel in supercritical alcohols. However, conversions of only 60–70% were obtained in the enzymatic synthesis even after 8 h.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copyright of this article belongs to Elsevier.
Keywords: Pongamia pinnata;Jatropha curcas;Biodiesel.
Department/Centre: Division of Mechanical Sciences > Chemical Engineering
Date Deposited: 04 Jun 2008
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2010 04:45
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/id/eprint/14169

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