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Factors influencing deformation stability of binary glasses

Murali, P and Ramamurty, U and Shenoy, Vijay B (2008) Factors influencing deformation stability of binary glasses. In: Journal of Chemical Physics, 128 (10). 104508-1-104508-6.

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Abstract

A possible mechanism of strain accommodation in large deformation of glasses is crystallization; deformation stability is a measure of the resistance of glasses to crystallization. We study the effect of atomic size ratio and atomic stiffness parameter (related to the curvature of the interatomic potential) on deformation stability of binary glasses using molecular static simulations. The deformation stability of a glass is found to increase with increasing atomic size ratio and magnitude of the atomic stiffness, which is proportional to the bulk modulus of the pure crystalline system, as well as the ratio of atomic stiffnesses of constituent atoms. To understand the role of the above parameters on deformation stability, misfit energies of randomly substituted solid solution fcc crystals and glasses are compared for various atomic size ratios and atomic stiffness values. Unlike in fcc solid solution, the misfit energy of binary glasses is found to be insensitive to the atomic size ratio. It is also found that the packing fraction of glasses is insensitive to the atomic size ratio, consistent with the above result. Beyond a critical atomic size ratio, the misfit energy of fcc solid solution exceeds the energy of the glass, thus making the amorphous state completely stable to deformation induced crystallization. Our analysis shows that critical atomic size ratio decreases with increasing atomic stiffness which leads to an increase in the deformation stability of glasses.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copyright belongs to American Institute of Physics.
Department/Centre: Division of Mechanical Sciences > Materials Engineering (formerly Metallurgy)
Date Deposited: 19 Jul 2009 08:36
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2010 04:54
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/id/eprint/16891

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