ePrints@IIScePrints@IISc Home | About | Browse | Latest Additions | Advanced Search | Contact | Help

Structure and Rheology of Cationic Molecular Hydrogels of Quinuclidine Grafted Bile Salts. Influence of the Ionic Strength and Counter-Ion type

Terech, Pierre and Dourdain, S and Maitra, U and Bhat, S (2009) Structure and Rheology of Cationic Molecular Hydrogels of Quinuclidine Grafted Bile Salts. Influence of the Ionic Strength and Counter-Ion type. In: Journal of physical chemistry B, 113 (14). pp. 4619-4630.

[img] PDF
jp809336g.pdf - Published Version
Restricted to Registered users only

Download (701Kb) | Request a copy
Official URL: http://pubs.acs.org/doi/abs/10.1021/jp809336g

Abstract

Quinuclidine grafted cationic bile salts are forming salted hydrogels. An extensive investigation of the effect of the electrolyte and counterions on the gelation has been envisaged. The special interest of the quinuclidine grafted bile salt is due to its broader experimental range of gelation to study the effect of electrolyte. Rheological features of the hydrogels are typical of enthalpic networks exhibiting a scaling law of the elastic shear modulus with the concentration (scaling exponent 2.2) modeling cellular solids in which the bending modulus is the dominant parameter. The addition of monovalent salt (NaCl) favors the formation of gels in a first range (0.00117 g cm-3 (0.02 M) < TNaCl < 0.04675 g cm-3 (0.8 M)). At larger salt concentrations, the gels become more heterogeneous with nodal zones in the micron scale. Small-angle neutron scattering experiments have been used to characterize the rigid fibers (<R> ≈ 68 Å) and the nodal zones. Stress sweep and creeprecovery measurements are used to relate the lack of linear viscoelastic domain to a mechanism of disentanglement of the fibers from their associations into fagots. The electrostatic interactions can be screened by addition of salt to induce a progressive evolution toward flocculation. SEM, UV absorbance, and SAXS study of the Bragg peak at large Q-values complete the investigation.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copyright of this article belongs to American Chemical Society.
Department/Centre: Division of Chemical Sciences > Organic Chemistry
Date Deposited: 15 Dec 2009 06:03
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2010 05:30
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/id/eprint/19876

Actions (login required)

View Item View Item