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Novel role of the nitrite transporter NirC in Salmonella pathogenesis: SPI2-dependent suppression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in activated macrophages

Das, Priyanka and Lahiri, Amit and Lahiri, Ayan and Chakravortty, Dipshikha (2009) Novel role of the nitrite transporter NirC in Salmonella pathogenesis: SPI2-dependent suppression of inducible nitric oxide synthase in activated macrophages. In: Microbiology, 155 (Part 8). pp. 2476-2489.

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Abstract

Activation of macrophages by interferon gamma (IFN- ) and the subsequent production of nitric oxide (NO) are critical for the host defence against Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium infection. We report here the inhibition of IFN- -induced NO production in RAW264.7 macrophages infected with wild-type Salmonella. This phenomenon was shown to be dependent on the nirC gene, which encodes a potential nitrite transporter. We observed a higher NO output from IFN- -treated macrophages infected with a nirC mutant of Salmonella. The nirC mutant also showed significantly decreased intracellular proliferation in a NO-dependent manner in activated RAW264.7 macrophages and in liver, spleen and secondary lymph nodes of mice, which was restored by complementing the gene in trans. Under acidified nitrite stress, a twofold more pronounced NO-mediated repression of SPI2 was observed in the nirC knockout strain compared to the wild-type. This enhanced SPI2 repression in the nirC knockout led to a higher level of STAT-1 phosphorylation and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression than seen with the wild-type strain. In iNOS knockout mice, the organ load of the nirC knockout strain was similar to that of the wild-type strain, indicating that the mutant is exclusively sensitive to the host nitrosative stress. Taken together, these results reveal that intracellular Salmonella evade killing in activated macrophages by downregulating IFN- -induced NO production, and they highlight the critical role of nirC as a virulence gene.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: copyright of this article belongs to Society for General Microbiology.
Department/Centre: Division of Biological Sciences > Microbiology & Cell Biology
Date Deposited: 21 Dec 2009 08:22
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2010 05:43
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/id/eprint/22734

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