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Genetically engineered monogamy in voles lends credence to the modus operandi of behavioural ecology

Gadagkar, Raghavendra (2004) Genetically engineered monogamy in voles lends credence to the modus operandi of behavioural ecology. In: Journal of Genetics, 83 (2). pp. 109-111.

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Abstract

Behavioural ecologists investigate the evolutionary forces that select for one behavioural pattern over another (Krebs and Davies 1991, 1993. ) Why do lions hunt in prides while the tiger stalks its prey alone? Why are honey bee workers so industrious while the drones are so lazy? Why do koels lay their eggs in the nests of crows while the latter go through the trouble of building nests and caring for chicks, their own as well those of the koel? Why do Siberian cranes fly some 6400 kilometres from their breeding grounds in Siberia to over winter in Bharatpur in Rajasthan, India, only to return to Siberia in summer? Why are males in many species of birds monogamous, pairing for life and providing paternal care to the chicks, while the males of many mammals are polygynous, mating with many females and contributing little more than a sperm-full of genes to their offspring?

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copyright for this article belongs to Indian Academy of Sciences.
Keywords: voles;monogamy;behavioural ecology;genetics of behaviour;vasopressin;Microtus
Department/Centre: Division of Biological Sciences > Centre for Ecological Sciences
Date Deposited: 14 Dec 2004
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2010 04:17
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/id/eprint/2457

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