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Structural studies of analgesics and their interactions. XII. Structure and interactions of anti-inflammatory fenamates. A concerted crystallographic and theoretical conformational study

Dhanaraj, V and Vijayan, M (1988) Structural studies of analgesics and their interactions. XII. Structure and interactions of anti-inflammatory fenamates. A concerted crystallographic and theoretical conformational study. In: Acta Crystallographica Section B, 44 . 406 -412.

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Abstract

A theoretical conformational analysis of fenamates, which are N-arylated derivatives of anthranilic acid or 2-aminonicotinic acid with different substituents on the aryl (phenyl) group, is reported. The analysis of these analgesics, which are believed to act through the inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis, was carried out using semi-empirical potential functions. The results and available crystallographic observations have been critically examined in terms of their relevance to drug action. Crystallographic studies of these drugs and their complexes have revealed that the fenamate molecules share a striking invariant feature, namely, the sixmembered ring bearing the carboxyl group is coplanar with the carboxyl group and the bridging imino group,the coplanarity being stabilized by resonance interactions and an internal hydrogen bond between the imino and carboxyl groups. The results of the theoretical analysis provide a conformational rationale for the observed invariant coplanarity. The second sixmembered ring, which provides hydrophobicity in a substantial part of the molecule, has limited conformational flexibility in meclofenamic, mefenamic and flufenamic acids. Comparison of the conformational energy maps of these acids shows that they could all assume the same conformation when bound to the relevant enzyme. The present study provides a structural explanation for the difference in the activity of niflumic acid, which can assume a conformation in which the whole molecule is nearly planar. The main role of the carboxyl group appears to be to provide a site for intermolecular interactions in addition to helping in stabilizing the invariant coplanar feature and providing hydrophilicity at one end of the molecule. The fenamates thus provide a good example of conformation- dependent molecular asymmetry.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copyright of this article belongs to International Union of Crystallography.
Department/Centre: Division of Biological Sciences > Molecular Biophysics Unit
Date Deposited: 04 Oct 2010 08:43
Last Modified: 04 Oct 2010 08:43
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/id/eprint/32572

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