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Injection-molded high-density polyethylene-hydroxyapatite-aluminum oxide hybrid composites for hard-tissue replacement: Mechanical, biological, and protein adsorption behavior

Tripathi, Garima and Basu, Bikramjit (2012) Injection-molded high-density polyethylene-hydroxyapatite-aluminum oxide hybrid composites for hard-tissue replacement: Mechanical, biological, and protein adsorption behavior. In: Journal of Applied Polymer Science, 124 (3). pp. 2133-2143.

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Official URL: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/app.352...

Abstract

In this article, we report the mechanical and biocompatibility properties of injection-molded high-density polyethylene (HDPE) composites reinforced with 40 wt % ceramic filler [hydroxyapatite (HA) and/or Al2O3] and 2 wt % titanate as a coupling agent. The mechanical property measurements revealed that a combination of a maximum tensile strength of 18.7 MPa and a maximum tensile modulus of about 855 MPa could be achieved with the injection-molded HDPE20 wt % HA20 wt % Al2O3 composites. For the same composite composition, the maximum compression strength was determined to be 71.6 MPa and the compression modulus was about 660 MPa. The fractrography study revealed the uniform distribution of ceramic fillers in the semicrystalline HDPE matrix. The cytocompatibility study with osteoblast-like SaOS2 cells confirmed extensive cell adhesion and proliferation on the injection-molded HDPE20 wt % HA20 wt % Al2O3 composites. The cell viability analysis with the 3(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay revealed a statistically significant difference between the injection-molded HDPE20 wt % HA20 wt % Al2O3 composites and sintered HA for various culture durations of upto 7 days. The difference in cytocompatibility properties among the biocomposites is explained in terms of the difference in the protein absorption behavior. (C) 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Appl Polym Sci, 2012

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copyright of this article belongs to John Wiley and Sons.
Keywords: biocompatibility;injection molding;mechanical properties
Department/Centre: Division of Chemical Sciences > Materials Research Centre
Date Deposited: 09 Mar 2012 11:47
Last Modified: 09 Mar 2012 11:47
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/id/eprint/43692

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