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A Novel Technique To Measure Interface Trap Density In A GaAs MOS Capacitor Using Time-Varying Magnetic Fields

Choudhury, Aditya Roy N and Venkataraman, V (2015) A Novel Technique To Measure Interface Trap Density In A GaAs MOS Capacitor Using Time-Varying Magnetic Fields. In: DAE Solid State Physics Symposium, DEC 21-25, 2015, Amity Univ, Noida, INDIA.

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Official URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1063/1.4948082

Abstract

Interface trap density (Dit) in a GaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitor can be measured electrically by measuring its impedance, i.e. by exciting it with a small signal voltage source and measuring the resulting current through the circuit. We propose a new method of measuring Dit where the MOS capacitor is subjected to a (time-varying) magnetic field instead, which produces an effect equivalent to a (time-varying) voltage drop across the sample. This happens because the electron chemical potential of GaAs changes with a change in an externally applied magnetic field (unlike that of the gate metal); this is not the voltage induced by Faraday's law of electromagnetic induction. So, by measuring the current through the MOS, Dit can be found similarly. Energy band diagrams and equivalent circuits of a MOS capacitor are drawn in the presence of a magnetic field, and analyzed. The way in which a magnetic field affects a MOS structure is shown to be fundamentally different compared to an electrical voltage source.

Item Type: Conference Proceedings
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Additional Information: copy right of this article belongs to the AMER INST PHYSICS, 2 HUNTINGTON QUADRANGLE, STE 1NO1, MELVILLE, NY 11747-4501 USA
Department/Centre: Division of Physical & Mathematical Sciences > Physics
Date Deposited: 22 Oct 2016 05:33
Last Modified: 22 Oct 2016 05:33
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/id/eprint/54521

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