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A Compliant Transmission Mechanism With Intermittent Contacts for Cycle-Doubling

Mankame, Nilesh D and Ananthasuresh, GK (2007) A Compliant Transmission Mechanism With Intermittent Contacts for Cycle-Doubling. In: Journal of Mechanical Design, 129 (1). 114 -121.

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Abstract

A novel compliant transmission mechanism that doubles the frequency of a cyclic input is presented in this paper. The compliant cycle-doubler is a contact-aided compliant mechanism that uses intermittent contact between itself and a rigid surface. The conceptual design for the cycle-doubler was obtained using topology optimization in our earlier work. In this paper, a detailed design procedure is presented for developing the topology solution into a functional prototype. The conceptual design obtained from the topology solution did not account for the effects of large displacements, friction, and manufacturing-induced features such as fillet radii. Detailed nonlinear finite element analyses and experimental results from quasi-static tests on a macro-scale prototype are used in this paper to understand the influence of the above factors and to guide the design of the functional prototype. Although the conceptual design is based on the assumption of quasi-static operation, the modified design is shown to work well in a dynamic setting for low operating frequencies via finite element simulations. The cycle-doubler design is a monolithic elastic body that can be manufactured from a variety of materials and over a range of length scales. This makes the design scalable and thus adaptable to a wide range of operating frequencies. Explicit dynamic nonlinear finite element simulations are used to verify the functionality of the design at two different length scales: macro (device footprint of a square of 170 mm side) at an input frequency of 7.8 Hz; and meso (device footprint of a square of 3.78 mm side) at an input frequency of 1 kHz.

Item Type: Journal Article
Additional Information: Copy right of this article belongs to the American Society of Mechanical Engineers
Department/Centre: Division of Mechanical Sciences > Mechanical Engineering
Date Deposited: 25 Aug 2008
Last Modified: 19 Sep 2010 04:34
URI: http://eprints.iisc.ernet.in/id/eprint/9711

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